Corrupt Me–Blog Tour/Book Review

Three words: That. Was. Intense.

 

 

Howdy ladies and gentlemen!

Alright, so this review is a definite step out of the comfort zone for me; primarily because this book is a New Adult one, a genre that I don’t journey often– perhaps ever– and also because this book was my first ever ARC! The excitement of that alone is a tad overwhelming. But with all that said, I would like to thank the wonderful author, Jillian Quinn–who is one of the sweetest humans on the planet–for giving me the opportunity to review her debut novel. You can find more about her on her website: jillianquinnbooks.com or simply give her a visit over at her blog! Yep, she’s a fellow blogger too! Check it out here.

So let’s see what the novel with the intriguing title is about, shall we?

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I have to say that the synopsis did interest me a bit; not because it has the bad-boy-good-girl vibe, but because it involved the mafia and the criminal underworld and that’s not something that I’ve come across often. Better still, it’s not your usual good-girl-bad-boy novel; simply because Isabelle–Izzie– isn’t a good girl. Not by a far cry.

As I said, this one came across as one hell of an intense read– everything was very heightened compared to what I’m used to. I’m certain, however, that it was a new trial for me, and I can’t say that I didn’t enjoy a few bits from it, like the food mentioned in this book, for instance. Now that was intense, alright (God.. just remembering is making me hungry).

I had a little issue throughout the book where I couldn’t exactly connect with Izzie. Izzie is a bit of a hot-head; someone who’d just go for it and pause to think about the consequences later after the deed is done. She’s rather athletic, smart, intellectual, and very confident in her adventurous lifestyle, generally. Compared to her, I’m in every bit her opposite; but I guess it was refreshing seeing how life would turn out for a character in a novel with those attributes.

I felt as though the relationship between Izzie and Luca was sort of purely physical. There was a definite instant attraction–but they did have a history, so that’s to be put in mind– but I didn’t see them talk about their feelings, really. Yes, in some cases action speaks louder than words, but it’s always healthy to converse too. Personally, I tend to gravitate towards that kind of subtlety, but our couple there preferred it intense.

I guess the book was more centred on how the two came to accept one another in their lives, what with each of them being so very stubborn and their own persons (does that make sense?), so the character development was highlighted there. Luca came across first as your typical hot and irresistible male love interest, but I loved his relationship with his Mother. I liked how he always acknowledged Izzie’s strength and admired her for it; so where I previously would’ve rolled my eyes a bit at the general attention that guy attracted, I now know where the appeal comes from– Luca is more that just a pretty face and I can see a lot of character growth for that guy.

The author’s writing style ranges from modern to classical descriptive, so in some instances it feels as though you’re literally listening in on the character’s thoughts, and in other cases, you’re reading a well-written novel; and that was a great thing to have.

If you want a novel with steamy scenes, a chemical romance with a touch of danger and a general easy-read, this novel is a great candidate. It showed me parts of the world that perhaps I wasn’t entirely aware of: it painted the wild college life and the temptations lust could present to us humans, and that definitely wasn’t something I thought we’d give in to easily, but this book proved me wrong. So it was definitely refreshing seeing all the wild parts us humans have suddenly unleashed on the pages.

Find more info about the novel here~ Goodreads . Amazon . Barnes & Noble


 

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More on the Author!


So is this your type of a read? Would you give it a go? Have you, already?

(Also also, how was my first official ARC review?)

Let me know in the comments below!

Love,

Midnight Ranter (aka Ayaka)

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The Mysterious Affair At Style– Book Review

Just when you think Agatha Christie’s books got old… she surprises you–practically arches one of her perfect eyebrows up–and, with a slightly devilish grin, triumphantly yells, ‘Ha! As if!’

 

..Leaving you staring after her awesomeness with your jaw practically passing out on the floor…

 

Hullo wonderful people!

Alright, dramatic reactions aside, let’s get on with the review and see what the back of the book has to say.

Agatha Christie’s first novel, The Mysterious Affair at Styles, was the result of a dare from her sister Madge who challenged her to write a story.

The story begins when Captain Hastings is sent back to England from the First World War due to injury and is invited to spend his sick leave at the beautiful Styles Court by his old friend John Cavendish. Here, Hastings meets John’s step-mother, Mrs Inglethorpe, and her new husband, Alfred. Despite the tranquil surroundings Hastings begins to realise that all is not right. When Mrs Inglethorpe is found poisoned, suspicion falls on the family, and another old friend, Hercule Poirot, is invited to investigate.

Now I know what you’re probably thinking right now is something along the lines of, ‘Hey mate, that sounds like a perfectly ordinary novel; what’re the theatrics up there for then?’

If you haven’t read anything by Agatha Christie before, I ought to tell you here and now that her books (or the few that I’ve read by her, at least) have this completely mystic aura about them, and maybe it’s the writing style, or perhaps it’s the tone, voice, soul or even spirit in between the pages; but there’s something that just gets you glued to the pages right away.

“You gave too much rein to your imagination. Imagination is a good servant, and a bad master. The simplest explanation is always the most likely.”

So I get that the plot sounds completely ordinary and perhaps even a little mundane for a lot of you, but to a mystery-loving ranter like yours truly here, this was everything. It was my first-ever Hercule Poirot novel, and I have to say, I was certainly not disappointed.

I guess a part of me was comparing Sherlock Holmes with Hercule Poirot in some subconscious way or another. (In case you don’t know– Sherlock Holmes is a fictional famous detective starring Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s novels (also Benedict Cumberbatch on BBC’s Sherlock, if you want a modern introduction); he also happens to be one of the greater loves of my life). So with two great detectives right there, I apparently had to compare them and see who does what better where.

Nope, don’t compare them, please.

“Sometimes I feel sure he is as mad as a hatter and then, just as he is at his maddest, I find there is a method in his madness.”

Poirot is a great little thing. And I don’t mean great in the Sherlock-Holmes-is-great sense; I mean he’s a wonderfully funny, comical and real character who’s surprisingly bubbly for someone so shrouded in mystery. I have noticed that throughout the entire novel, he spoke only with ambiguous wordings, literally making even the simplest facts seem doubtful. Because for some reason or the other, you think that maybe he’s lost a bit of his marbles with all the crazy cases he had to deal with, but oh boy is that man a genius. A genius so very mundane that it’s a tad intimidating how he doesn’t look or even appear it.

“Every murderer is probably somebody’s old friend,” observed Poirot philosophically. “You cannot mix up sentiment and reason.”

Christie’s novel, despite being a crime classic, was surprisingly breezy, humorous, and such an easy read. I guess what’s so impressive about her novels is that the amount of simplicity in them make them so amazingly crafted and complex that it kind of knocks you out and takes your breath away by the end. Her mystery was intriguing, definitely maddening and utterly amazing.

I know I have basically showered the book with compliments that seem out of place with a plot so simple, but this lady was not entitled the Queen of Crime for nothing, you guys. True, the way I felt kind of dumbfounded by the end wasn’t very flattering for neither me or poor Hastings (it’s written from his POV), but what can I say, I just love a challenging mystery. And this one?  This one was definitely one.


What about you? Read any mysteries lately? Will you give this one a go? Let me know in the comments below, I’d love to hear all about it! 

Loads of love, 

Midnight Ranter (aka Ayaka) 

Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children– Book Review 

I couldn’t just start the next book without reviewing this one here… Okay.. So, after my exams ended, I decided to feast my eyes on something that could take my mind away from all the emotions I’ve been through there.

To make it short, I’ve encountered an amazingly written, perfectly portrayed and awesomely paced novel that had me glued to its fervent pages.

Meet Jacob Portman, a teenage boy who, like us all, believe in the fairytales narrated by his favourite man— his grandfather. Many times did he dream and hope of leading an adventurous life that could compare to his grandfather’s; but his weakling of a self had been rather unfortunately keen on crushing those fantasies.

Following the quote “Be careful what you wish for”, Jacob does get his very own adventure when he stumbles upon The Home of Peculiar Children; who, for the fact, were bombed when a Nazi bomb was dropped on top of them.

And so begins his peculiar quest; and with it, he discovers many many things; facts about his grandfather that were never told or never believed in, things he didn’t know could actually exist, and power he never really thought he ever held.

The book takes a smooth turn from a contemporary realistic piece into a fascinating page-turner of wit and historical fiction.

A peculiar read indeed; and one that I absolutely loved.

–Midnight Ranter